Disaster loans available as zone of extreme drought expands in New Hampshire

Several New Hampshire counties have been declared disaster areas as the state’s extreme drought area continues to expand. >> Download the free WMUR app The Department of Agriculture offers emergency loans to anyone person from Cheshire, Coos, Grafton and Sullivan counties suffered casualties since June 1. A new drought map released Thursday shows areas in New Hampshire facing extreme drought, known as D3, continue to expand. “Eleven percent of the state is in D3, or extreme drought, with the rest of the state in D2 or D1,” said Tom O’Donovan, director of the Water Division of the Department of Environmental Services. extreme drought, O’Donovan said. “From Strafford County we extended the D3 west to the upper Merrimack Valley,” O’Donovan said. The Merrimack River is about a foot away. where it should be this time of year. Conditions are even better than they were in August. About 400,000 Granite Staters face some sort of water restriction, according to the state, and groundwater levels continue to drop. residential wells and systems, “O’Donovan said. He said residents can look for a few things to determine if they need to be concerned about their wells.” Look around your neighborhood and see what your surface waters look like, “he said.” Your ponds are they low? Are your rivers low? If they are, this tells you that surface water and groundwater is falling in your neighborhood. Other indicators of a problem include changes in the color, taste or smell of the well water. O’Donovan said water conservation is increasingly important. “You have to make sure your kids understand when they’re brushing their teeth to turn off the water. Really simple things like that,” he said. “Operation of full dishwashers and full loads of laundry.” Groundwater could be recharged before the ground freezes in late December or early January. After this point, no more water will find its way underground. “Only rivers, streams and ponds that are not frozen to the bottom then contribute groundwater,” O’Donovan said. “And that will put us in a bad place before winter and spring.”

Several counties in New Hampshire have been declared disaster areas as the area of ​​the state experiencing extreme drought continues to expand.

>> Download the free WMUR app

The Department of Agriculture is providing emergency loans to anyone in Cheshire, Coos, Grafton and Sullivan counties who have suffered losses since June 1.

A new drought map released Thursday shows areas in New Hampshire currently facing extreme drought, known as D3, continue to expand.

“Eleven percent of the state is in D3, or extreme drought, with the rest of the state in D2 or D1,” said Tom O’Donovan, director of the Water Division of the Department of Environmental Services.

Recent rainfall has helped somewhat, but it has not been enough to slow the expansion of the area currently facing extreme drought, O’Donovan said.

“From Strafford County we extended the D3 west into the upper Merrimack Valley,” said O’Donovan.

The Merrimack River is down about a foot from where it should be at this time of year. Conditions are even better than they were in August.

About 400,000 Granite Staters face some sort of water restriction, according to the state, and groundwater levels continue to drop.

“It impacts well systems across the state, both for community water supply systems and residential wells,” O’Donovan said.

He said residents can research a few things to determine if they should be concerned about their wells.

“Look around your neighborhood and see what your surface water looks like,” he said. “Are your ponds low? Are your rivers low? If they are, this tells you that surface water and groundwater is falling in your neighborhood. “

Other indicators of a problem include changes in the color, taste or smell of the well water.

O’Donovan said water conservation is increasingly important.

“You should work to make sure your kids understand when they’re brushing their teeth to turn off the water. Really simple things like that,” he said. “Operate dishwashers and full loads of laundry. “

Groundwater could be recharged before the ground freezes in late December or early January. After this point, no more water will find its way underground.

“Only rivers, streams, and ponds that aren’t frozen to the bottom then contribute groundwater,” O’Donovan said. “And that will put us in a bad place before winter and spring.”


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